Link

doctordisaster:

It just occurred to me one of the other reasons that Avengers cover looks so bad. You know, the other reasons; the ones lurking unobtrusively behind the twin trainwrecks of inept photoshopping and Mark Ruffalo’s ridiculous expression. We’ve got five superdudes grouped around one lady: Black…

When the suits were trying to decide who they’d shoehorn into the “Female Lead” part of the Avengers, I’m sure the gameplan was this:

"Sure, have her kick a little ass, give her one of these moments, get ScarJo to go on interviews and talk about the importance of a strong female character, and plant some rumors that she’s getting her own movie so the feminists get off our back.”

Frankly, it’s easier to do this with a character like “Black Widow” because she has no superpowers. She’ll be no different than every Super Sexy Lady Assassin, so it won’t be like audiences are clamoring for her. Scarlett Johannnnssson’s anti-acting also makes things easier. “See, we tried to have a female character in there, but nobody was interested in her! How can we justify giving her a movie!” 

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comicsalliance:

 
‘DC Universe Online’ Free-To-Play Starting In October
DC Universe Online’s long-rumored free-to-play model has finally arrived, splitting up the MMO’s payment models and accessibility between three increasingly priced tiers. “Free” players will have basic access and pay á la carte for some new content and features, “Premium” players will have slightly more access and options and “Legendary” players will pay $15 a month for what’s essentially an all-you-can-play buffet of what the game’s got to offer. If you already shelled out for DCUO on PC or PlayStation 3 any time between its January launch and the upcoming free-to-play switch, Sony says existing accounts with active paid subscriptions will be granted Legendary Access.From DCUO’s official press release:
 

Free: New players will now have access to the current gameplay in DC Universe Online (including Gotham City, Metropolis, and all current raids and alerts), with the ability to create two characters, join a league and many other benefits. Free level players will be able to purchase downloadable game packs/updates, additional character slots, powers and more through microtransactions.Premium: Any player who has spent at least $5 USD (including former paid subscribers and new players who have purchased $5 of in-game items) will qualify for the Premium access level. Premium level players will have more benefits available to them than the Free level player, including additional character slots, additional inventory slots, and higher cash limits. Downloadable adventure packs, additional character slots, and more can be purchased in-game.Legendary: Maximum features and benefits are included at this level. Loaded with enhanced additional features, Legendary access will be available for a $14.99 USD monthly fee and includes all DLC packs at no cost, more than 15 character slots, more than 80 inventory slots, the ability to form unrestricted-sized leagues, and many other benefits.

DC Universe Online joins its superhero MMORPG contemporaries Champions Online and City of Heroes, which have been free-to-play for several months. Marvel’s Super Hero Squad Online has been free from its launch and Marvel’s upcoming MMO written by Brian Michael Bendis is reportedly going to be free when it arrives as well. So basically, if you enjoy beating up digital dudes, it’s a fine time to be a superhero in MMO titles.
I’m coming for you, Lex Luthor.

comicsalliance:

‘DC Universe Online’ Free-To-Play Starting In October

DC Universe Online’s long-rumored free-to-play model has finally arrived, splitting up the MMO’s payment models and accessibility between three increasingly priced tiers. “Free” players will have basic access and pay á la carte for some new content and features, “Premium” players will have slightly more access and options and “Legendary” players will pay $15 a month for what’s essentially an all-you-can-play buffet of what the game’s got to offer. If you already shelled out for DCUO on PC or PlayStation 3 any time between its January launch and the upcoming free-to-play switch, Sony says existing accounts with active paid subscriptions will be granted Legendary Access.

From DCUO’s official press release:

Free: New players will now have access to the current gameplay in DC Universe Online (including Gotham City, Metropolis, and all current raids and alerts), with the ability to create two characters, join a league and many other benefits. Free level players will be able to purchase downloadable game packs/updates, additional character slots, powers and more through microtransactions.

Premium: Any player who has spent at least $5 USD (including former paid subscribers and new players who have purchased $5 of in-game items) will qualify for the Premium access level. Premium level players will have more benefits available to them than the Free level player, including additional character slots, additional inventory slots, and higher cash limits. Downloadable adventure packs, additional character slots, and more can be purchased in-game.

Legendary: Maximum features and benefits are included at this level. Loaded with enhanced additional features, Legendary access will be available for a $14.99 USD monthly fee and includes all DLC packs at no cost, more than 15 character slots, more than 80 inventory slots, the ability to form unrestricted-sized leagues, and many other benefits.

DC Universe Online joins its superhero MMORPG contemporaries Champions Online and City of Heroes, which have been free-to-play for several months. Marvel’s Super Hero Squad Online has been free from its launch and Marvel’s upcoming MMO written by Brian Michael Bendis is reportedly going to be free when it arrives as well. So basically, if you enjoy beating up digital dudes, it’s a fine time to be a superhero in MMO titles.

I’m coming for you, Lex Luthor.

Tags: comics gaming
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comicallyvintage:

I’ll Start My Career At Once!

GPOYEveryday.

comicallyvintage:

I’ll Start My Career At Once!

GPOYEveryday.

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comicsalliance:

‘Suicide Squad’ #1 Dies By Its Own Hand [Review]

By Chris Sims

I’ll be honest with you: I’m probably about as far from the target audience DC’s going for with the new Suicide Squad #1 that came out this week. Not only am I the opposite of a new reader, I’m specifically a guy who has a lot of attachment to The Way Things Used To Be. John Ostrander’s 66-issue run on Suicide Squad from the ’80s is one of my all-time favorite comics, but there are an awful lot of problems in this book that have nothing to do with how I feel about the old series and everything to do with the fact that it’s an angsty mess.

I’m not sure whether this is going to be the book that hooks new readers into the DC Universe, but going purely by what we’re given in this issue, they’re doing a pretty good job of alienating the ones they already had. It all comes down to an aesthetic change that they’ve made with the relaunch, taking away something that made a character visually unique in favor of the same look we’ve seen over and over again in comics.

I speak, of course, of Deadshot’s mustache. 
Comic books are experiencing a dire lack of interesting facial hair as it is, and to have such a magnificent handlebar replaced with wispy stubble is, for me at least, extremely off-putting.

But I kid. As much as I love Floyd Lawton’s rockin’ handlebar, there was an even more legitimately mystifying, seemingly pointless change made in this issue: The last-page reveal that apparently, Suicide Squad mainstay Amanda Waller has been rebooted into a younger body, complete with the standard issue hourglass figure boasted by virtually every other female character in comics.

It’s a big change from the shorter, stockier, older version of Waller we’ve had for the past 20 years, and to a fan of that character, it’s incredibly frustrating. The appeal of the original version of Amanda Waller wasn’t just that she’d climbed to the top of a secret government agency through sheer, indomitable willpower and enforced her tough decisions with an uncompromising demand for respect, and it wasn’t even just that she was one of the DC Universe’s most prominent black characters, and certainly the most prominent black woman. Those are undeniable factors in what makes her so great, but there’s another big aspect to it that simply comes down to the fact that she didn’t look like everyone else.

Read much more at ComicsAlliance.

This is important reading

Tags: comics
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comicsalliance:

Ask Chris #71: The Punisher… For Kids!

 

By Chris sims

Q: Has there ever been a Punisher toy line? If not, what kind of vehicles or Punisher toys could you come up with? — @Protoculture27

A: Back when I was still buying action figures that weren’t Destro, I always kept an eye out for Punisher figures, but unfortunately, he’s never been able to carry a full line of toys himself. And really, I can see why: You might be able to get a few variations out of Frank Castle himself, the rest of the line would pretty much consist of Microchip, Jigsaw, and maybe an “army builder” box full of dead mobsters that you could pile up around him. That’s about as far as you could go with it. There just aren’t enough recurring characters to fill out an entire line.

Of course, there’s also the fact that the Punisher is a guy who straight up murders people all the time, and that can be a difficult sell to parents out doing their Christmas shopping.


Of course, that doesn’t mean that there haven’t been any Punisher figures. There are plenty, mostly because the Punisher hit the high point of his popularity during a time when Marvel Comics was owned by a toy company, and as we all learned from America’s daring, highly trained Special Missions Force nothing quite appeals to the kids like an action figure of a guy who comes with his weight in guns, especially if they actually fire!

That’s the thing about Punisher figures : As much as I love the character he is the last person that should ever be made into a toy for children. The best thing you can say about him is that he fights bad guys, but even at his absolute best, he’s a guy who does nothing but kill other people, and he does it constantly, because he hates them. It is completely insane that someone would make a toy of that, but they did, and the fact that these exist will never stop being hilarious.

Much more on this at ComicsAlliance.

Tags: comics toys
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dcwomenkickingass:

Behold child … Barda. Tony Bedard’s classic Barda moment from his Birds of Prey run. Today is the birthday of Jack Kirby Barda’s creator (among many other things).

Some things are just the right combination of nerdy. I wonder if Barda would like Guillotine? Actually, that seems like more of a Darkseid game.

dcwomenkickingass:

Behold child … Barda. Tony Bedard’s classic Barda moment from his Birds of Prey run. Today is the birthday of Jack Kirby Barda’s creator (among many other things).

Some things are just the right combination of nerdy. I wonder if Barda would like Guillotine? Actually, that seems like more of a Darkseid game.

(Source: holavicente)

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futurejournalismproject:

Graphic novelist James Sturm wanted to see if he could get a cartoon into the New Yorker. To prepare, he decided to draw one “gag cartoon” a day until his 90-page sketch book was filled.

If making graphic novels felt like a staid long-term relationship, then doing gag comics is like playing the field. One day I could draw a fortuneteller; the next, an astronaut. I went from sultans to superheroes, robots to rabbits. I felt liberated. I refused to get bogged down or fuss over the drawings. I spent no more than an hour with any one cartoon, and many took far less time than that. For the first two weeks I was feeling my oats. I already had a half-dozen keepers and was confident there were plenty more winners on the way. It was at this point that I started dreaming of actually selling a cartoon to The New Yorker…
…By my fourth week of daily drawing, I hit a wall. It got harder and harder to generate gags, and I often found myself staring at a blank page at eleven o’clock at night, just wanting to get something down so I could go to bed. My measuring stick was the great New Yorker cartoonist William Steig. Besides knowing what made people tick, Steig possessed that holy combination of looseness and precision that gives great cartooning its casual authority. I knew I could never compare with Steig, but I didn’t want to embarrass myself, either. I had my pride, and if I was going to produce another 60 gags I needed to approach things differently.

James Sturm, Slate, How Hard Is It To Get a Cartoon Into The New Yorker?
Click through to see more of Sturm’s work, find out if it got published and learn about the inner workings of New Yorker cartoon culture.

This’ll be a popular reblog.

futurejournalismproject:

Graphic novelist James Sturm wanted to see if he could get a cartoon into the New Yorker. To prepare, he decided to draw one “gag cartoon” a day until his 90-page sketch book was filled.

If making graphic novels felt like a staid long-term relationship, then doing gag comics is like playing the field. One day I could draw a fortuneteller; the next, an astronaut. I went from sultans to superheroes, robots to rabbits. I felt liberated. I refused to get bogged down or fuss over the drawings. I spent no more than an hour with any one cartoon, and many took far less time than that. For the first two weeks I was feeling my oats. I already had a half-dozen keepers and was confident there were plenty more winners on the way. It was at this point that I started dreaming of actually selling a cartoon to The New Yorker…

…By my fourth week of daily drawing, I hit a wall. It got harder and harder to generate gags, and I often found myself staring at a blank page at eleven o’clock at night, just wanting to get something down so I could go to bed. My measuring stick was the great New Yorker cartoonist William Steig. Besides knowing what made people tick, Steig possessed that holy combination of looseness and precision that gives great cartooning its casual authority. I knew I could never compare with Steig, but I didn’t want to embarrass myself, either. I had my pride, and if I was going to produce another 60 gags I needed to approach things differently.

James Sturm, Slate, How Hard Is It To Get a Cartoon Into The New Yorker?

Click through to see more of Sturm’s work, find out if it got published and learn about the inner workings of New Yorker cartoon culture.

This’ll be a popular reblog.

(Source: futurejournalismproject)

Quote
"Q: [Mark Millar] still lives in Glasgow, is there a chance of bumping into him?
A: There’s a very good chance of running into him, and I hope I’m going 100 miles an hour when it happens."

Grant Morrison, interviewed in Rolling Stone, via The Beat. (via hangingfire)

This man makes me swoon.

(via )

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sexartandpolitics:

notemily:

Sinfest.

I have dreams of things. Being able to afford regular sensory deprivation tank visits is one of them.

A Handjob machine would be nice as well.

sexartandpolitics:

notemily:

Sinfest.

I have dreams of things. Being able to afford regular sensory deprivation tank visits is one of them.

A Handjob machine would be nice as well.