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If there’s anything I know about you New York City assholes, is that your made of some tough stuff, and that you’ll pull together and recover from this disaster. 

Stay safe guys. 

Life’s Grand Parade

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Why am I Following the Guggenheim?

I just started paying attention to my twitter feed again, and I noticed that I was following the Guggenheim. This is nothing against them, but why am I following the Guggenheim twitter?

This is my experience with the Guggenheim

  1. George Costanza, lying, mentions that his architecture firm did the new wing at the Guggenheim
  2. Men in Black
  3. Walking by it with native New Yorker. She said “And that’s the Guggenheim.” I said “Damn. My nigga Frank Lloyd Wright designed the shit out of that.”

And that’s it. 

I’ve got nothing against the SFG. I dig art and shit. Hell, I’d like to be one of those people who can’t go to a friend’s birthday because of “an opening at the Guggenheim.” Actually, that’s a dream of mine. The Guggenheim is terrible at twitter however. You think your’e going to get all these faux pretentious ruminations on art, and instead you realize what a boring musuem it is. It’s also kinda fratty. Check this out.

OMG, the Guggenheim smokes pot, I bet it  thinks it’s sooooo cool.

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good:

New Yorkers have the highest life expectancy in the nation. Why? They smoke less, walk more, and have more friends and neighbors. And because of a bunch of other reasons. Guess it’s time to put those “urban health penalty” myths to rest.

They’ve also pushed out all the poor people. 

good:

New Yorkers have the highest life expectancy in the nation. Why? They smoke less, walk more, and have more friends and neighbors. And because of a bunch of other reasons. Guess it’s time to put those “urban health penalty” myths to rest.

They’ve also pushed out all the poor people. 

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I’ve got my doubts about this documentary on CNBC

But if New York in the 70’s is what this country will look like after the Default, only like everywhere, the 10’s are going to be a wild ride. 

You can call me Snake.

EDIT: They ruin it by featuring one Mr. Rupert Murdoch. Ick.

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My favorite response to that David Simon piece

Was a tumble where a person says “I didn’t read the article, I just really liked that New Yorker cover with the map of the country from the Big Apple picture.” Oof! Sometimes it’s so naked! “As soon as I found out it wasn’t about New York, I stopped giving a shit.” 

Seriously, you people need to get out more. I’m sure Baltimore Magazine had some really cool covers.

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hotelcharlie:

oldnewyork:

capitalnewyork:

newsweek:

gillianmae:

David Simon on the doomed relationship between cities and their newsrooms.

“The newsroom is the essential vehicle for understanding a city,  because it’s not one guy at a computer trying to figure shit out,” he  said. “It’s a newsroom full of sources, it’s a newsroom full of people  who spent half their career on a beat. When the city hall reporter is  24-years-old, you know, you ain’t going to find out what’s going on in  city hall.”
Nor is it any consolation when new-media companies hire reporters to  cater to a national audience.
Of Arianna Huffington and her 13-million-unique-visitor-a-month  Huffington Post, Simon said, “She can dabble like a dilettante in  national politics—‘I’m going to hire eight, nine people, actually pay  them a salary, maybe, call them an investigative team and loose these  eight, nine people on Washington.’ When human beings can’t find out  what’s going on in Baltimore, Cleveland, St. Louis, Trenton and  everywhere else in the United States, how does that save journalism?
“The day that there’s a bunch of Huffington Post reporters in  Baltimore, and there’s a Baltimore edition of the Huffington post, then  you know what it is? It’s a newspaper and it’s online—it’s an online  paper and it’s something to be reckoned with. But until they’re going to  be there every day and until they’re going to have 40, 50, 60,000  readers in Baltimore, concerned about the issues in Baltimore, the  Huffington Post doesn’t mean shit to the average American. It doesn’t  mean shit to people in New York if they want to find out about metro  coverage.”
For Simon, the galling thing is not that print is yielding to  online—he makes a point of saying that he has no interest in preserving  newsprint (“you know, cutting down trees”). The problem is the  disappearance of a bunch of local outlets, to be replaced by a few big  national ones.


We’d love better business minds than ours to weigh in here, but we’ve long thought that the decline in local news organizations is just the end phase of a decline that started with the death of the local department store; we assume that Huffpo’s push into local, along with Patch, etc. is basically just the journalistic equivalent of Walmart, no? 

You should really read the whole article at Capital, since David gets into the business model and how the race for as many eyeballs as possible destroyed local newsrooms.

hotelcharlie:

oldnewyork:

capitalnewyork:

newsweek:

gillianmae:

David Simon on the doomed relationship between cities and their newsrooms.

“The newsroom is the essential vehicle for understanding a city, because it’s not one guy at a computer trying to figure shit out,” he said. “It’s a newsroom full of sources, it’s a newsroom full of people who spent half their career on a beat. When the city hall reporter is 24-years-old, you know, you ain’t going to find out what’s going on in city hall.”

Nor is it any consolation when new-media companies hire reporters to cater to a national audience.

Of Arianna Huffington and her 13-million-unique-visitor-a-month Huffington Post, Simon said, “She can dabble like a dilettante in national politics—‘I’m going to hire eight, nine people, actually pay them a salary, maybe, call them an investigative team and loose these eight, nine people on Washington.’ When human beings can’t find out what’s going on in Baltimore, Cleveland, St. Louis, Trenton and everywhere else in the United States, how does that save journalism?

“The day that there’s a bunch of Huffington Post reporters in Baltimore, and there’s a Baltimore edition of the Huffington post, then you know what it is? It’s a newspaper and it’s online—it’s an online paper and it’s something to be reckoned with. But until they’re going to be there every day and until they’re going to have 40, 50, 60,000 readers in Baltimore, concerned about the issues in Baltimore, the Huffington Post doesn’t mean shit to the average American. It doesn’t mean shit to people in New York if they want to find out about metro coverage.”

For Simon, the galling thing is not that print is yielding to online—he makes a point of saying that he has no interest in preserving newsprint (“you know, cutting down trees”). The problem is the disappearance of a bunch of local outlets, to be replaced by a few big national ones.

We’d love better business minds than ours to weigh in here, but we’ve long thought that the decline in local news organizations is just the end phase of a decline that started with the death of the local department store; we assume that Huffpo’s push into local, along with Patch, etc. is basically just the journalistic equivalent of Walmart, no? 

You should really read the whole article at Capital, since David gets into the business model and how the race for as many eyeballs as possible destroyed local newsrooms.

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Waking up to Rhapsody in Blue will get you some fucking New York dreams

Specifically, dreams about partying with some Tina Brown character and Salman Rushdie at the Met, or the Guggenheim, or one of those pretentious places. Eating finger foods and talking about my trip to the hamptons. And you know what? Usually, I’d be stabbing myself with lead to get out of something like that, however, with Rhapsody in Blue suspiciously providing a soundtrack, I rather enjoyed myself.

Then I walked out, and the Tina Brown character gave me directions to Brooklyn. I had a house party to go to. 

piano: Dum Dum Dum Dum Dum, Dum Dum Dum Dum Dum Dum Dum DUM….