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Issues and Junk

I think it’s important, here’s a list.

1. I expect better from our journalists. I expect them to be cynical assholes, who hang out at bars drinking scotch, their ear perked up to some whispered conversation in the corner. I expect them to pick at sacred cows until the skeletons start falling out. There’s a reason we hold them in such contempt/esteem. They’re supposed to be the people who get at the truth, no matter how ugly. Now it feels like they spend most of their time being a wing of public relations for “Real American Heroes.” For every reporter that had questions about the Lance and Manti narratives, there were a thousand who turned a blind eye, so enraptured in their true blue stories of heroism that they failed to fucking do their job. Unforgiveable.

2. I mean what is ESPN for anyway? What’s the point of having a billion journalists on retainer if you’re not going to use them? They want the aura of respectability I suppose, but other than injury reports, transfer notices, and puff pieces, they serve no purpose. 

Gene Wojciechowski, an espn reporter, had a chance to do some serious fucking journalism. With all of his resources, he couldn’t find a death certificate, an obituary, hell, a fucking picture of this famous linebacker’s recently deceased leukemia girlfriend anywhere. Instead of letting the beasts of his journalistic nature loose, he said “Fuck it.” and rolled with it. 

And yeah, I would’ve done the same thing, whatever. 

Here’s something to consider. If Wojciechowski figured it out, would he have had the time and network backing to run with it? One thing you’ll notice about ESPN lately is their reticence to target a sacred cow. Basically, the entertainment wing is fearful of the skeletons the investigative wing can uncover. This is understandable. You know, capitalism? These coaches, athletes, universities, teams, leagues… they hold grudges, and there is way too much money on the table to push around the big daddies. They gain a lot more by being second to the story than they do by rocking the boat.

Again, understandable. But if you’re doing that, maybe you should just give up on hiring journalists? Just make yourself a 24 hour talking head gabfest. A loyal servant of the empire. 

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Thanks Gawker.

Thanks Gawker.

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Into his conference call, the CNN producer says (correctly) that the Court has held that the individual mandate cannot be sustained under the Commerce Clause, and (incorrectly) that it therefore “looks like” the mandate has been struck down. The control room asks whether they can “go with” it, and after a pause, he says yes.

The Fox producer reads the syllabus exactly the same way, and reports that the mandate has been invalidated. Asked to confirm that the mandate has been struck down, he responds: “100%.”

The Bloomberg team finishes its review, having read the Commerce Clause holding and then turned the page to see that the Court accepted the government’s alternative argument that the individual mandate is constitutional under Congress’s tax power. At 10:07:32 – 52 seconds after the Chief Justice began speaking – Bloomberg issues an alert: “OBAMA’S HEALTH-CARE OVERHAUL UPHELD BY U.S.SUPREME COURT.” Bloomberg is first, and it is right.

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The Bloomberg team finishes its review, having read the Commerce Clause holding and then turned the page to see that the Court accepted the government’s alternative argument that the individual mandate is constitutional under Congress’s tax power.

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(Source: storyofman)

Tags: journalism
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Does anybody speak Turkmen?

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The best part about the previous story is the reporter, Sara Hogan’s tweet, saying “Haters gonna Hate.” Hate what, you forcing two golfers to go back on the links to reenact their final round? Go on brush your shoulders off. 

I’ve been cursed with too much insight. Ever action is micromanaged to such a degree that I end up doing nothing. Meanwhile, there are people out there who’ll come to a golf course late, then tell their crew “Just get the golfers to do it again.” Then, when they get called out on it, they’re like “Man, people got nothing better to do than complain about a breach of journalistic ethics.”

I missed my calling. I should’ve been evil.

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The Future of Journalism, Today!

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hotelcharlie:

oldnewyork:

capitalnewyork:

newsweek:

gillianmae:

David Simon on the doomed relationship between cities and their newsrooms.

“The newsroom is the essential vehicle for understanding a city,  because it’s not one guy at a computer trying to figure shit out,” he  said. “It’s a newsroom full of sources, it’s a newsroom full of people  who spent half their career on a beat. When the city hall reporter is  24-years-old, you know, you ain’t going to find out what’s going on in  city hall.”
Nor is it any consolation when new-media companies hire reporters to  cater to a national audience.
Of Arianna Huffington and her 13-million-unique-visitor-a-month  Huffington Post, Simon said, “She can dabble like a dilettante in  national politics—‘I’m going to hire eight, nine people, actually pay  them a salary, maybe, call them an investigative team and loose these  eight, nine people on Washington.’ When human beings can’t find out  what’s going on in Baltimore, Cleveland, St. Louis, Trenton and  everywhere else in the United States, how does that save journalism?
“The day that there’s a bunch of Huffington Post reporters in  Baltimore, and there’s a Baltimore edition of the Huffington post, then  you know what it is? It’s a newspaper and it’s online—it’s an online  paper and it’s something to be reckoned with. But until they’re going to  be there every day and until they’re going to have 40, 50, 60,000  readers in Baltimore, concerned about the issues in Baltimore, the  Huffington Post doesn’t mean shit to the average American. It doesn’t  mean shit to people in New York if they want to find out about metro  coverage.”
For Simon, the galling thing is not that print is yielding to  online—he makes a point of saying that he has no interest in preserving  newsprint (“you know, cutting down trees”). The problem is the  disappearance of a bunch of local outlets, to be replaced by a few big  national ones.


We’d love better business minds than ours to weigh in here, but we’ve long thought that the decline in local news organizations is just the end phase of a decline that started with the death of the local department store; we assume that Huffpo’s push into local, along with Patch, etc. is basically just the journalistic equivalent of Walmart, no? 

You should really read the whole article at Capital, since David gets into the business model and how the race for as many eyeballs as possible destroyed local newsrooms.

hotelcharlie:

oldnewyork:

capitalnewyork:

newsweek:

gillianmae:

David Simon on the doomed relationship between cities and their newsrooms.

“The newsroom is the essential vehicle for understanding a city, because it’s not one guy at a computer trying to figure shit out,” he said. “It’s a newsroom full of sources, it’s a newsroom full of people who spent half their career on a beat. When the city hall reporter is 24-years-old, you know, you ain’t going to find out what’s going on in city hall.”

Nor is it any consolation when new-media companies hire reporters to cater to a national audience.

Of Arianna Huffington and her 13-million-unique-visitor-a-month Huffington Post, Simon said, “She can dabble like a dilettante in national politics—‘I’m going to hire eight, nine people, actually pay them a salary, maybe, call them an investigative team and loose these eight, nine people on Washington.’ When human beings can’t find out what’s going on in Baltimore, Cleveland, St. Louis, Trenton and everywhere else in the United States, how does that save journalism?

“The day that there’s a bunch of Huffington Post reporters in Baltimore, and there’s a Baltimore edition of the Huffington post, then you know what it is? It’s a newspaper and it’s online—it’s an online paper and it’s something to be reckoned with. But until they’re going to be there every day and until they’re going to have 40, 50, 60,000 readers in Baltimore, concerned about the issues in Baltimore, the Huffington Post doesn’t mean shit to the average American. It doesn’t mean shit to people in New York if they want to find out about metro coverage.”

For Simon, the galling thing is not that print is yielding to online—he makes a point of saying that he has no interest in preserving newsprint (“you know, cutting down trees”). The problem is the disappearance of a bunch of local outlets, to be replaced by a few big national ones.

We’d love better business minds than ours to weigh in here, but we’ve long thought that the decline in local news organizations is just the end phase of a decline that started with the death of the local department store; we assume that Huffpo’s push into local, along with Patch, etc. is basically just the journalistic equivalent of Walmart, no? 

You should really read the whole article at Capital, since David gets into the business model and how the race for as many eyeballs as possible destroyed local newsrooms.

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"The mood was just as bleak for the fans leaving Buffalo Wild Wings."

— Thank you KUSports.com.